Harper and the Press

In Harperland, Lawrence Martin points out how Harper hates the press (you can see it in this campaign, with the 19th century schoolmaster’s Five Questions policy).

In a chapter on Harper’s press policy, called “the Control Fixation”, Martin relates this story (pg. 65):


In Harperland, Lawrence Martin points out how Harper hates the press (you can see it in this campaign, with the 19th century schoolmaster’s Five Questions policy).

In a chapter on Harper’s press policy, called “the Control Fixation”, Martin relates this story (pg. 65):

“In April, Harper caused a flap when he refused to recognize the next questioner in line at a press conference, picking a reporter in the back instead. this prompted the snubbed journalist, the CBC’s feisty Julie Van Dusen, to ask ‘Why are you ignoring the lineup? We’re in a lineup, and I’m next.’ Harper continued to ignore her, but the reporter he’d called on chose not to ask a question. Van Dusen kept pressing and asked hers instead. The PM gave a terse response and, with a to-hell-with-this look, headed for the exit.”

On the same page of the book:

“Tom Flanagan summed up the view of many in Harperland when he said, ‘The press gallery is a bunch of self-important, preening prima donnas who think they’re crucial because they’re stationed in Ottawa and they’ve watched All the President’s Men too many times.'”

Lawrence Martin points out that the press in Canada now has a right-wing bias. I can imagine how the Harper people would view the press if it was actually representative of the diversity of views you find in Canada.

The right word is probably “contempt”, which I do hope is returned in a month.

Justin Podur

Author: Justin Podur

Author of Siegebreakers. Ecology. Environmental Science. Political Science. Anti-imperialism. Political fiction. Teach at York U's FES. Author. Writer at ZNet, TeleSUR, AlterNet, Ricochet, and the Independent Media Institute.