Kill some Canadians? Kill some UN observers? No problem…

Israel bombed a UN post and killed some observers.

They’ve also stated that if an international force is to go to the newly-leveled Lebanon in order to protected those who leveled it from the people who have been slaughtered, displaced, and whose city has been leveled, they’d prefer it not be the UN. Eloquently reinforced by the bombing: a bombing is worth a thousand words.


Israel bombed a UN post and killed some observers.

They’ve also stated that if an international force is to go to the newly-leveled Lebanon in order to protected those who leveled it from the people who have been slaughtered, displaced, and whose city has been leveled, they’d prefer it not be the UN. Eloquently reinforced by the bombing: a bombing is worth a thousand words.

In that same story on the killing of the UN observers, the Associated Press offered this praise for Israel: “Despite the attack on a house in Nabatiyeh Tuesday, it appears that Israel has been easing its bombardment in populated areas and roads in Lebanon that has killed hundreds and displaced as many as 750,000, while focusing its attacks on Hezbollah at the front.”

Generous of Israel, “easing its bombardment in populated areas”.

The evacuation of Lebanese-Canadians continues to be a major story in Canada. When the time came to evacuate the Lebanese-Canadians from Lebanon, there was a considerable amount of disgusting noise about the cost of evacuation and whether it should be borne by taxpayers. The terms of debate were wrong, of course – the whole evacuation ought to have been an education in collective punishment (another word for which is terrorism) and the immorality of aerial bombing, and the hypocrisy of Harper evacuating Canadians from a bombing on the one hand while supporting the bombers on the other.

But instead the terms of debate were whether these were “real” Canadians and whether “real” Canadians ought to pay for their evacuation. The idea of “dual loyalty” was once a staple of anti-semitism – Nazis and other anti-semites would argue that Jews could not be loyal to their countries of residence because their primary loyalty was to Jews – and it is tragic to see that Canadian culture still embraces it.

Justin Podur

Author: Justin Podur

Author of Siegebreakers. Ecology. Environmental Science. Political Science. Anti-imperialism. Political fiction. Teach at York U's FES. Author. Writer at ZNet, TeleSUR, AlterNet, Ricochet, and the Independent Media Institute.